Tag Archives: solitary

Connections and Relationships

Solitary Confinement?
Many people consider books to be a solitary hobby but they are most mistaken, books bring people together in so many ways.
• The local play group have a story time, usually amongst lots of noise and crying.
• The public libraries also have baby and toddler story times so as to encourage new or new to the local area mums to meet.
• There are book cafes, book clubs, and books about book clubs (Jane Austen Book Club) which become so popular they become movies.
•There are online book clubs, such as goodreads and LibraryThing.

History to today
The earliest surviving papyrus scrolls are c2400 BC to where books today are virtual (eBooks). Many occupations rely on books, from the writer to the publisher, the book seller and the librarian, the printer and the archivist. Books are anything but solitary.

 

Babies and Toddlers

Children are introduced usually to a book that they soothe their gums with or push under the water in the bathtub. Before they are able to speak most children are read to each night until they are able to read to themselves and don’t want a good meaning parent snuggling up reading to them. Although, one father chose to read every night to his daughter until it was no longer possible, The Reading Promise: 3218 nights of reading with my father, was written by Alice Ozma, the daughter and she reveals a beautiful bond that was treasured through reading. This inspires most parents to attempt this feat but sadly, life gets in the way.

Youth

When children stop, to read a book, they are carried to various places, times, and events. They are only limited by their imagination and this allows them to recharge from the craziness of today’s busyness and demands. They are able to switch off from their real lives and any problems or issues are put to one side so that they are able to immerse themselves into the character in the book. University of Sussex, 2009 study, found that reading for 6 minutes can reduce stress levels up to 68%. Books help children overcome situations, teaching them how to deal with things like bullying or even just how to care for their new pet.

Books are not the answer to all life’s issues but they can take you to a place where no one else has been nor can enter.

Except for this one time…..

Further Reading

.A study of 17,000 people from birth indicates that reading for pleasure improves not just literacy, but maths ability too. And we will soon know whether the effects continue into adult life

New research shows works by writers such as Charles Dickens and Téa Obreht sharpen our ability to understand others’ emotions – more than thrillers or romance novels.
12 Scientific ways reading can actually improve your life.
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Filed under Community building, Early & Emergent Readers, Pre-Readers (Snuggle Books), Proficient Readers, Reading Programs, Reluctant Reader

Are classics that important?

My mum had my brothers and I reading classics from an early age.  I was reading Austen, Bronte, Dickens whilst in primary school. I was not an amazing English student but I loved reading and reading classics was all I knew.  I was not allowed to read other novels. So when I was told in my first English class, in high school, we were going to read and analyse a John Steinbeck novel I was thrilled. I had already read Of Mice and Men (written 1937) and I believed that soon we would be reading Shakespeare, Tolstoy and Kafka.  My excitement and enthusiasm were soon deflated when I was given, The Red Pony, a very depressing book, especially for animal lovers.

I now know why I love reading classics. They contain beautifully constructed prose, are filled with information of a world long gone and gives an insight into books and novels that were really a cherished form of art and quite exclusive.

FAST FORWARD 17+ years

I still LOVE reading and as I have stated previously, I have four gorgeous children. I wanted to instill this love of reading, especially classics, but sadly they love every other genre but not classics. They have read one or two but I have found unless I read to them (even my soon to be 15 year old still loves me to read to him) they find it unenjoyable. My children find the prose to wordy, filled with too much description, old colloquialisms and are just “BORING!”.  Modern novels grab the readers attention from the first paragraph, have less adjectives and descriptive paragraphs and are less “wordy”, so I am told by Miss R.

Is this a result of today’s society? The hustle, bustle and fast paced world that we live in? We don’t have time to waste even when reading?

Is it because the other types of media,TV, Computers, DVDs etc, are so engaging and give instantaneous gratification? Classics take a few chapters for one to be engrossed into the story.

Have we, as a society, moved on from these types of books? Has language changed that much?

Are kids today lazier or not as intelligent (if so what has caused this?) and find these types of books too much effort?

My mother thinks it is today’s parents’ fault, and that I am failing as a parent, as we don’t force our children to read the classics. I personally don’t want to force my children to read a book of my choosing.  I do, suggest books I think they may enjoy. I know that they are not dumb so one may skip, flick through a book pretending to read. Even worse they could begin to detest reading if forced to read something that is of no interest to them. So I will never force them to read a classic hoping in time they may choose to read one.

I know my children love reading as much as I do but they enjoy different genres to my favourites.  Which, has led to many interesting and enjoyable dinner table conversations. Which I think is what reading is all about, connecting with others by sharing ideas and thoughts.

 

 

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Filed under General thoughts, Proficient Readers, Reluctant Reader